StriderCamp

 

AblePlay Endorsement of Strider Camp Shows Benefits for Children of All Abilities


Rapid City, SD (May 26, 2015) –  Strider Sports International, Inc., the world’s leading manufacturer and marketer of no-pedal balance bikes, is pleased to announce its Strider Camp, a five session Learn-to-Ride curriculum, has been highly rated by AblePlay as a “Great Find” that helps children with disabilities develop balance, coordination, and other valuable developmental skills. Recognized for their innovation, safety, and ease-of-use, STRIDER® Bikes join an elite list of products reviewed and rated by AblePlay.

“We evaluated the program under AblePlay “Great Finds,” as Strider Camp is not a toy, but a teaching tool to help kids learn to ride a bike inclusively and independently. Kids are having fun while working on their skills to ride a bike”, stated Ahren Hoffman, CTRS and Manager of Industry Relations & Partnerships for the National Lekotek Center. “Strider Camp received checkmarks in all five of the developmental categories—we were thrilled to award Strider Camp such high marks!” said Hoffman.

STRIDER Camp AblePlay Seal
AblePlay is an online resource at www.ableplay.org that provides comprehensive research, ratings, and reviews on toys and products that are a good fit for children of all abilities. By providing concise, insightful reviews, AblePlay helps parents choose from among the thousands of toys for children.

The Strider Camp evaluation was conducted by Lekotek Certified professionals who have degrees and experience in special education, child life, therapeutic recreation, or other therapy disciplines. The AblePlay seal represents the quantifiable rating by disability category. The ratings concluded the Strider Camp, along with the STRIDER Bikes,promoted key developmental processes, including “action concepts, core strengthening, stability, coordinated movement, gross motor skills, balance, and self-esteem.”

“Our main mission is to give kids of all abilities the chance to experience the joy of riding a bike,” stated Ryan McFarland, Founder and CEO of Strider Sports International, Inc. “We are honored to be recognized by AblePlay and excited about the opportunity this gives us to share the Strider story with a new world of moms, dads, and young families. This endorsement of Strider Camp shows our training methods and our bikes are perfect tools for building confidence and bringing the thrill of the riding experience to children of all abilities.”

To see the STRIDER Bikes in action with kids of all abilities, visitwww.StriderBikes.com/special-needs-bikes.

Published in In The News
Tuesday, 03 September 2013 15:24

We Love Getting Emails Like this!

Strider People,

There are a few things in a first time parent’s life that we are always excited for, yet wary of. Teaching a child how to swim, how to read, how to add two numbers together - these things come so naturally to us we almost don’t remember the time we didn’t know how to do them. So when it came time to teach my daughter how to ride a bike, I was an odd mix of eager and terrified. I had no idea what to do.

After tons of research I finally decided on a Strider bike. I admit I was skeptical with all the claims of how easy it was – my daughter tends to be timid and reserved when trying new things, rather than bold and daring.
strider3She was 2 ½ when it arrived and though I was immediately impressed with how well it was built I was quite intimidated. I remember standing there, holding the bike with my daughter next to me, thinking, well…now what? So I just put it on the ground and showed her where to put her hands, where to sit, how to walk forward on it. She did the rest herself. I stayed back and watched as my daughter taught herself how to glide on this bike.
 
Within a week she was keeping up with us, coasting down hills and making turns as if the bike was an extension of herself. I was impressed, yet still skeptical. Sure, she could ride a Strider, but what about when I have to teach her how to pedal?
strider1

She was 5 when she finally outgrew her little Strider. Remembering the trauma and torn knees and fear and tears of my own bike training experience, I put off teaching her a pedal bike as long as possible. One day I finally broke down and took my daughter to a bike trail near our house.
strider2I hopped out of the car, pretending to be far more confident than I was, and strapped on her helmet. I put the bike on the ground and had her straddle it. Immediately all my research failed me. I stood there for several seconds, terrified and inadequate. I honestly had no idea how to teach my daughter to ride a bike.
 
Then I found myself saying, “Just pretend it’s your Strider, and when you start coasting, put your feet on the pedals.”
 
Let me take a break in this narrative to say that I went into this experience expecting a certain outcome based on my experience as a child. I expected blood loss and weeping. I expected scars and screams, I expected to run beside her holding the seat, I expected the entire process to take months.
 
But what actually happened was I took my husband’s hand and watched as my daughter taught herself to ride a bike.
 
She never fell down once. She had learned how to catch herself on the Strider and it translated easily to a bigger bike. She never found herself losing balance for any reason other than an inability to quickly locate the pedals with her feet. There were no tears, no crying, no running beside the bike while struggling to keep her upright. I never even touched the bike. Within 15 minutes she was riding several feet at a time and it was, overall, such an enjoyable experience that she is going to miss out on many linguistic tropes in her life. So many metaphors in English are centered around how hard it is to learn to ride a bike – but thanks to Strider, for my daughter, learning to ride a bike was as hard as learning how to eat Cheerios.

aripedalbike1

I am, now, finally, convinced. I will never own another first bike for my children than a Strider and will be recommending them to everyone I know.

By the way, after 3 years we resold her little pink Strider to another child just learning to bike. Aside from slight wear on the seat, it looked almost brand new.

 

Thank y'all, you've made this mama very, very happy.

Amber

 

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Published in Reviews