Friday, 19 February 2016 03:44

A Boy and His Bike

RyanABoyAndHisBike2

We love hearing from Strider parents so when we got this letter and photo from Ryan's parents we knew we had to share it:

Ryan is a beautiful, active, funny, smart, amazing child.  He is a six year old boy with diagnosed speech and motor Apraxia and ADHD.  Life, this far, has been difficult for Ryan – he has a hard time with speech, fine and gross motor activities – plus he cannot sit still!  He can understand everything you say but cannot always communicate with you understandably or effectively.  An easy-to-understand definition of apraxia is difficulty planning and producing.  Ryan knows what he wants to say and what movements he wants to make but cannot plan and produce the sounds/movement. 

Ryan has had all styles of bicycles -  from tricycles, “hot wheels,” scooters to training wheels on a “Big Kid” bike.  Ryan always ended up frustrated and mad at the bike.  When he was given his blue strider his Dad and I were skeptical.  Ryan got his Strider for his 6th birthday, which, unfortunately is in November.  Not optimal bike riding weather in South Dakota.  Ryan rode his Strider throughout the house all winter.  Dad and I decided that patching and painting walls was worth it.  It took him a little while to get the hang of using his legs for movement while sitting on the seat but he finally mastered it.

What has his Strider done for Ryan?  This bike has given our child so much and we are so thankful.  Not only can Ryan ride his bike, he wants to.  His bike has given him imaginative freedom.  The strider has been a riding lawn mower, a garbage truck and a fire truck.  The gross motor development has been huge – not only can he ride his Strider but his running, walking, jumping and all gross motor movements have gotten better and stronger.

If Ryan is playing outside he is usually on his Strider.  The other day he was riding in a few inches of snow.  Ryan wants to go on bike rides on the bike path and he is proud that he can ride his bike.  The confidence that his Strider has given Ryan is priceless! 

Keith and Erin (Ryan's parents)

Published in Parents Are Talking

A special guest post by  Amy Heuston Special Education Teacher at Central High School in Rapid City, SD

AmyGrady

 

I watched in awe and exhilaration as I cheered on two of our school’s Special Olympics athletes recently in the Special Needs Races at the Strider World Championship. Sweet, yet quite competitive, 13-year-old Ali led most of the race, agilely keeping just ahead of 19-year-old Grady. His longer legs and strong stature gave him a powerful push, and he edged past her at the finish.

As we congratulated each other with hugs, I smiled with pride and pure joy. I could hardly believe that just two years prior, neither of them had ridden a two-wheeled bike. And here they were, speeding along on STRIDER Balance Bikes, nimbly navigating cones and ramps, then celebrating with friends and family as they enjoyed the freedom and accomplishment of riding a bicycle—a milestone that many of us take for granted.

As a Special Education Teacher at Central High School in Rapid City, SD, I use 13 STRIDER Bikes with my students. They aren’t just an “extra” developmental tool, they’re a huge part of our program. We keep them in our classroom and use the bikes often. We incorporate the STRIDERs with our science curriculum to demonstrate their ability while riding to “observe or experience speed,” which is one of the areas they need to understand on the standardized tests. I also integrate examples and exercises using STRIDERs into their Individualized Education Programs (IEPs).

We knew the STRIDERs would have physical benefits, which were confirmed by a recent study of kids with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). But I have seen their impact in five areas; PT, OT, Speech, Behavioral and Social. What we’ve seen with our students aligns with studies such as Motor Profile of Children With Developmental Speech and Language Disorder, which found that, “developmental speech and language disorders are frequently associated with motor problems … The findings support the need to give early and more attention to the motor skills of children with developmental speech and language disorders in the educational and home setting, with special attention to children whose speech is affected.”

This research article, The Motor-Cognitive Connection: Early Fine Motor Skills as an Indicator of Future Success, states, “There is a clear connection in the circuitry of the brain between areas controlling fine motor skills and areas controlling cognition … These areas are developing simultaneously, with exceptional speed during early brain development.”

1. Physical Therapy (PT): Grady is just one of my students who has made great strides with his gross motor skills, balance and coordination from riding, and even transitioned to a pedal bike after nine months of riding the STRIDER Bike two to three times a week. The progression of walking and then striding on the bikes also helps improve core stability and strength. Some of the kids even show off their “BMX-style” tricks by standing up on the foot rests and sticking out one leg.

2. Occupational Therapy (OT): Many kids with autism also have Sensory Processing Disorder. This interrupts learning, as they want to crash and move, so it is hard to sit still and focus. Sensory seekers thrive from sensory input, and the “rushing” that goes by their ears as they ride a STRIDER provides this sensation.

Riding stimulates the vestibular system which we use to negotiate balance. It also helps the proprioceptive system, which refers to sensory input and feedback telling us about movement and body position. This physical movement and sensory input has a calming effect. One of my students has severe autism and riding a STRIDER helps calm him down.

Experts in SPD know riding bikes helps in several areas. The article Sensory Processing Disorder: Vestibular Dysfunction reinforces that, “Riding a bike is good for helping almost all of the senses, especially vestibular and proprioceptive. Balance can really be a struggle for lots of kids. Giving opportunities to have fun and practice using the vestibular system is important.”

Some teachers overlook the need for physical movement with kids with special needs. Every teacher has to figure out the reason. Is it just unusual behavior? Is he simply being “a boy?” Or is it SPD? One boy I have is a “bouncer” who bounces on a ball. He also bounces when he’s on his STRIDER.

3. Speech Therapy: I am positive that riding a STRIDER balance bike has increased the vocabulary of my students. When they experience something new, they talk about it with peers and family. One student rarely communicated last year. He loves being on a STRIDER so much that when we did karaoke, he insisted he do it while sitting on the bike, and he even made it “dance.”

He loves cops and robbers, so we put a picture of the siren on the handlebars. He would ride around the room making siren noises and talking to people. This year, his behaviors are better and his vocabulary has improved. I’m sure there are many contributing factors, but I believe the STRIDER is one of them.

4. Behavioral Interventions: In regard to student behaviors, I use the bikes both as a reward and also preventative measure. As a reward, they sometimes have to earn the opportunity to ride by showing good behavior. This works particularly well with some students, as the incentive to ride helps encourage them to focus on work.

As a preventative measure, I know riding helps calm them down. So if I see one of them getting agitated, I suggest we take a spin on the bike. I schedule time in our weekly plans to ride at least two or three times a week, but sometimes we ride all five days. When it’s nice, we ride outside. If it isn’t, we just take them around the halls. The administration understands how important time on the bikes is for our students.

5. Social Skills: Riding helps them to be socially accepted and do something their peers are doing—those with special needs and typical kids. We even play games together on STRIDERs at school.

The Adaptive PE teacher is also stoked about STRIDERs and has the kids compete against each other in a game kicking a large, lightweight Omnikin sport ball while riding the bikes. This helps develop their spatial awareness of self in relation to people and objects around them. While they’re competitively playing, they are looking up, paying attention and following the rules.

At least two of our Special Olympics athletes have even transitioned to pedal bikes, which makes me think of a sixth benefit of learning to ride: mobility. Riding gives them the opportunity to even ride to work someday, which would provide a more positive and independent future!

Some people who are outside the field of disabilities may say, “Oh, that’s cute,” when they see an individual with a disability riding a bike. They have no idea how challenging it can be to get that to the point of riding on two wheels, nor do they understand the impact riding has in several areas of their lives. The five areas above build upon each other; improved spatial awareness helps them feel more comfortable riding and spend more time doing it, which increases agility, balance and strength. With better behavior, their social skills with peers and family members improve.

Someday I want to pursue an MA and would love to do a research project on STRIDER’s impact in each of these areas. I know the results would be significant, as I see it every day in my school!

Published in In The News

Tanis

Tanis on his STRIDER 16 Sport

Guest blog post by Patricia Fox (Tanis and Aiden's Mom!) - My husband Rhys is a mountain unicyclist and avid rider. When we got pregnant with my oldest son Tanis, we had hoped he would be Rhys’ sidekick as I do not ride unicycles. However, that has not happened due to some of the symptoms of Tanis’ autism. Our second son, Aiden, also has autism, so we weren’t sure we would ever be able to ride bikes together as a family. How wrong we were!

Now we ride around the neighborhood and even take the bikes camping with us. Our sons share a unique bond because of the bikes. This wouldn’t be possible if we hadn’t tried a STRIDER Bike when they were young. And we couldn’t continue riding as a family if the company had ignored my request (among others I’m sure!) for a larger sized balance bike.

Tanis AidenTanis was diagnosed with severe autism when he was three years old, and is nine now. He struggles with poor core strength and low stamina, making riding a bike very difficult. My other son, Aiden, is six and also on the spectrum, but much more physical.

Several years ago, we came across a video of an 18-month-old on a STRIDER at a BMX track, so we thought we’d try one. We learned that every kid reacts differently. Some have a slower transition from walking to just getting comfortable enough to put their butts down on the seat. When they finally lift up their feet and really balance for the first time, their faces shine with a “Look what I can do” expression!

Tanis got his STRIDER first, the original 12” model, when he was five. He liked it, but after Aiden got his and started riding it, that really encouraged Tanis. When Tanis outgrew the small bike, we got the 16” model and it opened many riding doors for us as a family, since it was light weight and easy to ride. We were so proud when he rode it and joyfully shouted, “I did it! I did it!

Tanis is tall for his age and so we knew he would soon outgrow that bike. A couple of years ago, I sent the folks at STRIDER a request asking them to continue their excellent work and make another model for even older ages. We were so happy to see the 20” model come out in 2014. We were even more thankful to receive one through the generosity of Black Hills Family Support. Tanis loves riding his bike and says it’s “shiny and cool.”

We donated Tanis’ 16” STRIDER to LifeScape, the school Aiden attends for OT and other programs. I read recently about research that riding a STRIDER helps kids with autism. In the past, Tanis’ therapists used his bike to help with his core strength and gain balance and coordination. Aiden’s therapists work with him on his bike now.

Aiden started riding the STRIDER when he was three and was extremely attached to it. He even wore out the tires, so we had to replace them. After about a year and a half on the STRIDER, we decided to try a pedal bike. We were stunned that the transition to pedaling happened in a matter of minutes!

If it wasn’t for a STRIDER, we don’t think Aiden could have learned to ride a pedal bike. We realized that training wheels don’t really teach kids how to balance. As my husband said, “Why didn’t anyone think of this bike before?”

Tanis also learned to ride a pedal bike. Unfortunately he is distracted easily, so he had several accidents and minor injuries (we made sure he wore pads and a helmet). He sticks with his STRIDER now and feels safer. With the footrests, it’s easier for him to put his feet down quickly.

TanisQuote

Having both of the boys on two wheels has opened up a lot of possibilities to ride as a family. We could walk to the local park a few blocks away, but it’s so much more fun and cooler to ride bikes! We also name things while riding, such as stop signs or other markers.

We take the bikes camping in our renovated old school bus to Custer State Park and other local places. We tried tent camping, but the sound of the rain on the tent freaked out Tanis. Having the bus makes it easy to bring along the bikes.

One of the greatest benefits of riding is the special bond it has created between Tanis and Aiden. It’s something they can share together. On their bikes, they’re typical boys who enjoy racing back and forth on the sidewalk in front of our house or around the campground during trips.

They also ride with other kids in the neighborhood, which is an important social connection for them, especially for Tanis. Since his autism is severe, sometimes his behaviors confuse other kids. When he’s riding his bike, he’s just like them. He feels like a regular kid, and I love seeing him so happy.

Published in Parents Are Talking